A Traveller's Guide to Vancouver

Things to do in Vancouver

Spend a day relaxing and exploring the park

Stanley Park is the city's most popular attraction, covering 405 hectares and surrounded by the harbour and the bay. There are many paths throughout the park that lead to attractions and restaurants, but it is the seawall which is the most popular. This 10 km loop around the park is split in two for walkers and cyclists, and offers spectacular views and photo opportunities. In the centre of the park is an aquarium, and another highlight is the collection of totem poles and carvings at Brockton Point.

Skiing and sightseeing at the North Shore Mountains

There's plenty of skiing and hiking to be done in these mountains, but it is Grouse Mountain in particular which tourists love to visit. The mountain offers spectacular views of Vancouver, and when the city lights are shining it's truly a sight to behold. Skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and outdoor skating is permissible during the winter months, and during the summer it is a hiker's paradise. The Grouse Grind hiking trail climbs up over 2.9 kilometres. It has been given the nickname "Mother Nature's Stairmaster".

A glimpse of something new in the old

Gastown is the oldest suburb in Vancouver, named after a tavern owner nicknamed Gassy Jack. His habit of telling lengthy stories became legendary, and the area went from being known as Gassy's Town to Gastown. The area has cobbled streets and iron lamp posts in tribute to it's heritage, and there are many restaurants, shops and galleries in restored Victorian buildings. Another attraction in the area is the steam-powered clock built in 1977, which chimes every 15 minutes.

Not for the faint-hearted

The Capilano Suspension Bridge is the city's oldest tourist attraction. Opened in 1889, it is a footbridge 140 m long, 70 m above a deep river canyon. The bridge leads to a park containing forest trails and other activities like eco-tours and award-winning gardens. It also contains the largest private collection of First Nations totem poles, costumes and period decor. The First Nations are groups of various Aboriginal Canadians.

Discover the culture of Canada's Indigenous Peoples

The Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia has many exhibits displaying artefacts from cultures around the world, but particularly from First Nations. These include indigenous totem poles and other wooden figures and objects. Another popular exhibit is a yellow cedar sculpture, named The Raven and the First Men by Bill Reid, which was shown on the Canadian twenty dollar bill for eight years.

If you don't want to miss our best deals

Great deals in a flash

Great deals in a flash

Easy and
fast booking

All airlines,
all destinations

English speaking
customer service